‘I’m not a racist, I just don’t think it’s possible’: ‘Black Lives Matter’ activist discusses the backlash

It’s hard to say exactly what inspired the backlash.

Some say the outrage was born of misunderstanding and miscommunication.

Some see it as an attempt to delegitimize the movement by calling it a “white supremacist” movement.

Others see it more as an attack on the movement itself.

For now, the backlash appears to have taken on a personal tone.

“I’m just a normal person who is worried about how the movement is perceived,” said Margo Allen, a 24-year-old who identifies as black.

Allen has been a “Black Lives Matters” activist for several years.

The Black Lives Matter movement has seen its share of controversies, but none quite like the one surrounding Allen’s involvement with the movement.

Allen said she’s been approached by people who want to talk to her about her involvement in the movement, but she said she has not been approached in a formal way.

Allen’s story is part of a larger pattern of white people who are being targeted by black activists who are challenging the movement’s message.

“They want to be heard, and that is not something I’m interested in,” Allen said.

“We’re not out to silence anybody.

We’re out to empower people to be empowered.”

The backlash started with Allen’s decision to speak out.

In March, Allen and a group of other Black Lives Matters activists launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for “mental health and advocacy services for victims of police brutality and racial profiling.”

The goal was to raise $30,000 in the first 24 hours of the campaign.

After the first day, Allen received an anonymous phone call.

It was from a white man in his late 30s, who told Allen she was “a racist” and asked her to delete her GoFundme account.

“That’s when I was like, I don’t know how to delete that.

I’m a white woman, I’m black, I live in New York City.

This guy is telling me to delete my account,” Allen recalled.

“He said, ‘This is how I feel.

When she attempted to access her account, she said her account was flagged for “black out.” “

Allen’s account was temporarily disabled as the campaign progressed.

When she attempted to access her account, she said her account was flagged for “black out.”

Allen said that after she attempted another account to donate to her cause, the account was automatically blocked again.

Allen told The Verge that the person calling her suggested she delete the GoFundME account because of a comment she made on Twitter that said, “Black lives matter.”

“But then there was a very specific allegation that he had said that the Black Lives matter movement was a white supremacist organization.” “

There was no racism involved,” Allen told the Verge.

“But then there was a very specific allegation that he had said that the Black Lives matter movement was a white supremacist organization.”

The conversation went on for several hours, but Allen said the man eventually changed his tone.

Allen later received another anonymous call.

“My boyfriend was calling me from the phone and he was saying, ‘You should be ashamed of yourself.

You shouldn’t be participating in a black-owned business, you should be on the side of the law and be a victim of police violence,'” Allen said, describing the conversation.

Allen also said the phone call prompted her to create an account with her employer to verify that the account belonged to her.

The account was later permanently disabled, as Allen said her employer didn’t want to pay for her to attend a conference that was planned for next month.

The GoFund Me campaign has since been pulled.

“When it first happened, I was shocked because I was completely unaware of the level of racism and threats that had been made to my personal and professional life,” Allen explained.

“The conversation went beyond the GofundMe campaign, which was a completely legitimate thing.

People were calling me racist.

I was being threatened.

People said I should shut up.

And if I wasn’t, I would not have been safe.” “

If I was in a position where I was willing to pay my employer, then I would have been able to go to the conference.

And if I wasn’t, I would not have been safe.”

When Allen was finally able to make a payment to attend her conference, she was told she was responsible for $1,000 of her $30-per-day cost.

Allen, who has been outspoken about the issue of racial profiling, told The Washington Post that the event organizers were not transparent with her about the costs of attending the conference, and said the group also threatened to have her fired.

“It felt like it was about my personal safety,” Allen added.

“People were saying, it’s a white nationalist conference.

I said, well, that’s fine.

That’s okay.

That is a white person’s conference.

You don’t have to be a white dude to go.”

“They had my